(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Tattler"

THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG. MASSACHUSETTS 

1 943 




THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1 943 



Dedication 



THIS ISSUE OF THE TATTLER IS DEDICATED 
WITH DEEPEST ADMIRATION AND RESPECT TO 
THOSE MEN AND WOMEN OF OUR ALUMNI WHO 
ARE SO GALLANTLY SERVING THEIR COUNTRY IN 
THE FAR-FLUNG FIELDS OF THE WORLD. WE 
WOULD PAY SPECIAL TRIBUTE TO THOSE NOW 
AWAITING THEIR COUNTRY'S CALL. A FEELING 
OF GREAT PRIDE AND APPRECIATION ACCOM- 
PANIES THESE REPRESENTATIVES OF OUR 
SCHOOL NOW NUMBERING OVER ONE HUNDRED, 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE; AND THE HOPE IS 
EXPRESSED THAT THEY MAY RETURN TO A LAND 
OF PROMISE AND PEACE— THE RESULT OF THEIR 
SUPREME EFFORT. 



THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief, Irene Metz '43 

Assistant Editors, Jean Crone '43, Arlene Sabo '43 

Business Manager, Bette Lou Harlow '43 

Assistants, Betty Damon '43, Charlotte Otis '43 

Alumni Editor, Mildred Shaw '43 

Exchange Editor, Donald Harry '44 

Sports Editor, John Polwrek '44 

Literary Editor, Edna Shaw '43 

Joke Editor, Betty Damon '43 

Faculty Advisor, Annetta Barrus 



CONTENTS 

Dedication 2 

Senior Class Pictures 4 

Class History 12 

Class Prophecy 14 

Class Will 16 

Class Grinds 18 

Class of '44 20 

Class of '45 21 

Class of '46 22 

Editorials 23 

Literary 24 

Newspaper Staff 28 

Tattler Staff 29 

Forensic Group 30 

Pro Merito 31 

Baseball .32 

Basketball 33 

Golf 34 

Alumni Notes 35 

Advertisements 38 

Autographs 37 




WILLIAM HOMER BISBEE 

"To plow and sow, and reap and mow, and be a far- 
mer's boy." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Concert 2; Student Council 3, 4; 
Vice-Pres. 4; N. F. L. 3, 4; Debating 4; Pro-Merito 3; 
Editor-in-Chief Inkspot 4; Home Room Council 1. 



MARY JANET BOWKER 

"As merry as the day is long." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Treasurer 1; Basketball 1, 
2, 3; All Star Game 3; Minstrel 3; Concert 2. 



DONALD ELLSWORTH CAMPBELL 

"My style and my sentiments are my own, purely orig- 
inal." 



HELEN SNOW CARVER 

'Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low, an excellent 
thinjr in woman." 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2. 



JUNE COLBURN 

"In thy face I see the map of honour, truth, and loy- 
alty." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pro-Merito 3, 4; Concert 2; Min- 
strel 3; Basketball 1; Debate 4; Class History. 




JEAN FRANCES CRONE 

"She was a scholar, and a ripe and good one." 

Class Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Pro-Merito 3, 4; President 3; 
Secretary-Treasurer 4; Business Manager Inkspot 4; As- 
sistant Editor-in-Chief Tattler 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Con- 
cert 2; High Honor Graduation Oration. 



MARION RUTH CULVER 

"Sober, steadfast, and demure." 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Concert 2. 




ELIZABETH ANN DAMON 

"Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite 
variety." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Concert 2; Minstrel 
3; Pro-Merito 3, 4; N. E. I. 3, 4; Vice-President 4; Entrant 
in State Speech Tournament 3; Cheerleader 3, 4; Campus 
Capers Editor Inkspot 4; Assistant Business Manager of 
Tattler 4; Joke Editor Tattler 4; Home Room Council 1; 
Class Prophecy. 







CAROLYN EMERSON 

"She was wont to speak plain and to the purpose." 
Glee Club 1, 4. 



FROSTINE ADELLA GRAVES 

"Here is a dear and true industrious friend." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert 2; Class Historian 3, 4; 
Alumni Editor of Inkspot 4. 



GENEVA GRAVES 

"She that was ever fair and never proud, Had tongue 
at will and yet was never loud." 

Class Secretary 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Minstrel 3; Con- 
cert 2. 



ELIZABETH LOUISE HARLOW 

"A happy soul, that all the way 
To heaven hath a summer's day." 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Minstrel 3; Concert 2; N. F. L. 4; Sec- 
retary 4; Class Secretary 4; Feature Editor Inkspot 4; 
Business Manager Tattler 4; Assistant Editor-in-Chief 
Tattler 3. 






MILLARD HERBERT HATHAWAY 
"How thy wit brightens!" 
Secretary Class 2. 




/ '/ 



ROGER EDWARD KING 

"I am in danger, I see, of being included among the 
whimsical fellows." 

Glee Club 1. 





SHIRLEY MARGUERITE KNIGHT 

"Quiet, calm, she seems to be. But there is no girl more 
gay than she." 

Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Pro-Merito 3, 4; Class Grinds. 



IRENE PHYLLIS METZ 

"My companion, my guide, and mine own familiar 
friend." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Concert 2; Minstrel 3; Basketball 1, 
2, 3; Home Room Council 1; Pro-Merito 3, 4; President 
4; Secretary 3; Treasurer N. F. L. 4; Assistant Feature 
Editor of Inkspot 4; Editor-in-Chief Tattler 4; High Hon- 
or — Oration. 





FRANK WELLS MUNSON 

"For every why he had a wherefore." 
Glee Club 1, 2; Student Council 3. 



ROBERT EUGENE MUNSON 

"He possesses the truth and a science of his own in- 
vention." 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Minstrel 3; Circulation Editor of 
Inkspot 4; Concert 2. 



LORENA NIETSCHE 
"Better late than never." 
Glee Club 1, 2; Concert 2; Minstrel 3. 







JOHN JOSEPH O'BRIEN 

"Jack was so comely, so pleasant, so jolly." 

Basketball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3; Captain 4; Soccer 2; 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Sports Editor Inkspot 4; Track Mana- 
ger 3; President of Class 2; Class Vice-President 3. 



CHARLOTTE PRESTON OTIS 

"Her bright smile haunts me still." 

Basketball 1, 2, 3; All-Star 3; Basketball Manager 1, 4; 
Concert 2; Operetta 1; Vice-President Class 2; President 
Class 3; Assistant Business Manager Tattler 4. 




ARLENE MAE SABO 

"Exceeding wise, fair-spoken and persuading." 

Class President 1; N. F. L. 3, 4; Secretary 3; Pro-Meri- 
to 3, 4; Vice-President 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant 
Business Manager Inkspots 4; Assistant Editor-in-Chief 
Tattler 4; High Honor — Oration. 





EDNA JOSEPHINE SHAW 

"Tis good to live and learn." 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Pro-Merito 3, 4; N. F. L. 4; Literary 
Editor Tattler 4; Basketball 2; High Honor — Oration. 





LESTER WILLIAM SHAW 

"A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the best of men" 

Glee Club 3, 4; Pro-Merito 3; Quarterly Staff 2. 





MILDRED ETHEL SHAW 

"If she was tall? Like a king's own daughter, 
If she was fair? Like a mornin' o' May." 

Vice President Class 4; Assistant Editor-in-Chief Ink- 
spots 4; Student Council 3, 4; President 4; D. A. R. 4; 
Alumni Editor Tattler 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pro-Merito 
3, 4; Class Secretary 3; Quarterly Staff 2; N. F. L. Treas- 
urer 3; Ex Comm. N. F. L. 4; Class Will. 



NORMA LORRAINE WELLS 

"Laugh and the world laughs with you." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Minstrel 2; Secretary Glee Club 
2, 3, 4. 



DONALD FRANKLIN WICKLAND 
"Dance is life itself." 




JOSEPH WILLIAM HAIGH 

"We sailors are jealous of our vessels." 

Basketball 4. 

First member of class to enter the service, joining the 
Navy in February 1D43. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



11 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT Irene Metz 

VICE PRESIDENT Mildred Shaw 

SECRETARY Bette Lou Harlow 

TREASURER Jean Crone 

CLASS HISTORIAN Frostine Graves 



GRADUATION NIGHT 
CLASS HISTORY 
CLASS PROPHECY 
CLASS GRINDS 
CLASS WILL 



June Colburn 

Betty Damon 

Shirley Knight 

Mildred Shaw 



GRADUATON NIGHT ORATIONS 



The History of Our Flag 
The Flag and its Meaning 
The Flag of the Past 
The Flag and the Future 



Jean Crone 

Irene Metz 

Edna Shaw 

Arlene Sabo 



CLASS MOTTO — Climb Though the Rocks be Rugged 
CLASS GIFT — Alumni Honor Roll Plaque 



SENIOR CLASS 



William Bisbee 
Mary Bowker 
Donald Campbell 
Helen Carver 
June Colburn 
Jean Crone 
Marion Culver 
Betty Damon 
Carolyn Emerson 
Frostine Graves 
Geneva Graves 
Joseph Haigh 
Millard Hathaway 
Bette Lou Harlow 



Roger King 

Shirley Knight 

Irene Metz 

Frank Munson 

Robert Munson 

Lorena Nietsch© 

John O'Brien 

Charlotte Otis 

Arlene Sabo 

Edna Shaw 

Lester Shaw 

Mildred Shaw 

Norma Wells 

Donald Wickland 



12 



THE TATTLER 



Class History 



My research work was interrupted one 
day by a F.B.I, agent who wanted to enlist 
my aid. Among some important papers that 
had come into their possession was a manu- 
script that they had found impossible to 
de.ipher. Therefore, they turned the papers 
over to me. After studying it for sometime, 
I finally found the key to the code. Tonight 
I have brought you people together and 
am going to read parts of this manuscript 
to you. Of course this is all to be held in 
the strictest confidence. It is very valuable 
information and has Jong been sought by 
the Gestapo. It reveals certain personal bits 
of information of a class very important 
to the present and future days. A great 
deal is expected of them as is shown by 
this record of previous days which, deci- 
phered, reads as follows: 

"September 5, 1939. Fifty awed?— no- 
scared? — well yes, but willing scholars 
made their way slowly up the stairs and 
turned to the left where they were greeted 
by the cheery smile of Mr. Melody. 

That first day and week! Many a bewild- 
ered student stumbled into the wrong room 
only to hurriedly start again to find a place 
of refuge. The first few weeks they stalked 
the halls quietly as mice in deadly fear of 
what might happen if they raised their 
voices to a whisper. 

Soon ominous rumblings were heard 
amongst the upper classmen. Alas, Fresh- 
men Initiation! The dreaded event started 
at last. Then came a proclamation from 
the faculty stating: "The Freshman initia- 
tion has been abolished until further no- 
tice." After that they suddenly came to life; 
no longer were they the quietest class in 
the school, and no longer, I'm sorry to 
admit, were they the model class. 

Freshman Reception was the first big 
social event of their life. Instead of the 
usual torture to which freshmen are usu- 
ally submitted, they sat back while the 
melodious strains of music, laughter, and 
gayety reached their ears. After that very 
enjoyable evening these scholars knew they 
had really been accepted as a part of the 
school. 



Not to be outdone by any of the other 
classes, and to show their independence, 
they held a meeting at which the follow- 
ing officers were elected. President — George 
Molloy; Vice-President — Arlene Sabo; Sec- 
retary — Geneva Graves; Treasurer — Mary 
Bowker; Historian — Mildred Shaw. 

The rest of the year was rather unevent- 
ful. At times however the upper classmen 
often thought they heard weird sounds 
emitting from Room 6. Upon investigation 
these noises could be easily traced to the 
musical voice of the teacher, the choral 
speaking during English class, and the 
hilarious laughter which greeted the plays 
that had been labored over by 50 consci- 
entious playwrights. Thus on a note of 
gayety, nothing could keep their spirits 
down for long — not even tests — their first 
year ended. 

The next year 53 students, known as 
Sophomores, carried their merry laughter 
to every nook and corner of the high 
school. Soon after the opening of schol, 
they decided that they should try their hand 
at politics once more. As a result of that 
political enterprise they had Jack O'Brien 
as President; Charlotte Otis as Vice-Pres- 
ident; Millard Hathaway as Secretary; Jean 
Crone as Treasurer; and Mildred Shaw as 
Historian. 

This too was the year they welcomed 
three new teachers, Miss Damon, Mr. Mul- 
laly, and Mr. Walker. They also entered 
upon their career as social entertainers by 
giving the Valentine Party which was a 
great success. They were not only socially 
prominent but athletically promising as 
well. 

September 1941. This was the time they 
had been waiting for — they were now up- 
per classmen. As they strutted through the 
halls they no longer seemed even distantly 
related to the meek little Freshmen who 
had timidly treaded the halls in 1939. 
Again they had the privilege of greeting 
some new teachers. Miss Barrus for Eng- 
lish, and Miss Webber as Mathematics and 
History teacher. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



To lead the class, Charlotte Otis took 
on the duties of President assisted by Jack 
O'Brien as Vice-President; Mildred Shaw 
as Secretary; Jean Crone as Treasui'er; 
and Frostine Graves as Historian. It was 
that year that they learned that all their 
studying had not been in vain for there 
were ten Pro Merito members to represent 
the class. 

The organization of the Student Council 
brought about the need for another election 
at which Mildred Shaw and William Bis- 
bee were chosen as representatives. 

A great tragedy seemed to have taken 
place when it was decided to give up the 
Prom as their part towards helping the 
war effort. 

At the beginning of their senior year 
they rushed merrily up the stairs. Election 
time had come again. That time their Pres- 
ident was Irene Metz; Vice-President— 
Mildred Shaw; Secretary — Bette Lou Har- 
low; Treasurer — Jean Crone; and Historian 
— Frostine Graves. The Student Council 
Representatives were Mildred Shaw and 
William Bisbee. 

This year they were not only Seniors but 
they also had charge of initiating the 
Freshmen. You see the faculty had with- 
drawn the proclamation that had been put 
into effect when they were freshmen. 
After Freshman Reception was over every- 
one agreed, even the Freshmen, that they 
had had a "super-elegant" time. The sen- 
iors once imbued with the idea of always 
providing excellent entertainment continued 
to keep up the good work at the Christ- 
mas party — and in classes, sometimes much 
to the annoyance of the teachers. 

The war had affected them in many 
ways. Mr. Mullaly and Mr. Walker were 
called into the service, and once more 
there were new teachers in the building. 
These were Miss Lawe, the teacher of 
commercial subjects, and Miss Merritt, the 
teacher of French. 

Not only did they lose some teachers to 



the army but also three of their class- 
mates joined the service. Junior Jenkins 
joined the Navy before school started that 
year, Joe Haigh left for the Navy in Febru- 
ary, and Donald Campbell left for the 
army in the May draft group. 

A victory corps was organized at the 
school which performed many duties such 
as writing to the boys in the service, col- 
lecting books for the service men, keep- 
ing an account of the number of bonds 
bought by the individuals, and the organ- 
ization of the Forest Fire Fighters. 

The Class of '43 was proud to have four 
high honor students in its midst and four 
honor students. 

Although Forenic work was curtailed a 
great deal because of world conditions four 
Seniors were able to obtain the points 
needed for keys. 

Among the various activities of these 
four years certain students stand out as 
future "greats" of the country. 

Destined Olympic winners include Jack 
O'Brien, winner of 3d high score among 
basketball players of Western Massachu- 
basketball plaers of Western Massachu- 
setts; Charlotte Otis and Mary Bowker also 
of basketball fame. 

Among the great statesmen and leaders 
of the United States in future years are 
sure to be Irene Metz, Jean Crone, and 
Mildred Shaw. 

The orators of the new era will include 
Bette Lou Harlow, and Arlene Sabo. 

Promising scientists are Donald Camp- 
bell and Lester Shaw. 

In fact, in all fields, it will not be un- 
usual to find the name of some member of 
this class of '43." 

Now that this information has been di- 
vulged you can perhaps realize its signi- 
ficance to those enemies of our country. 
Great things are expected of these individ- 
uals mentioned in this document and it is 
they on whom our future rests. 



14 



THE TATTLER 



Class Prophecy 



Calling Williamsburg, 3441. Go ahead 
Miss Harlow. Hi, there Bette Lou. Seems 
good to hear your voice again. Well, 
here I am over in Germany; the war's over 
and it seems good to walk down these 
streets of Berlin and know we own them. 
You know — the funiest thing happened yes- 
terday — met one of our old classmates 
over here at the burning of Hitler — DON 
WICKLAND — with a girl under each arm. 
How typical of Don, I thought. "Hello, 
there," I said, "and what are you doing 
over here" 

"Well, hello, Betty," Don cried, 'I'm 
waiting to get back to the U. S., but most 
of all, back to my old girl." 

"Girl?" I questioned. 

"Sure," said Don— "ARLENE SABO— 
remember her?" 

"Well, my goodness, she's married to 
that Merritt fellow she went with for so 
long! Too bad, old boy — she was a swell 
kid — but let's forget about it and tell me 
more about the good old class of '43." 

"Well," began Don, "remember the Mun- 
son fellow at high school — ?" 

"Oh, you mean Frank?" I asked . 

"No, BOB. Well, he's done all right for 
himself in this war — for after this excite- 
ment is over tonight, they're presenting 
him with Tunisia for capturing the whole 
Jap Navy!" 

"Whew!" I exclaimed. 'But how about 
his cousin, FRANK?" 

Oh, haven't you read about him?" asked 
Don, "he's back home — still up in Chester- 
field — raising potatoes for the entire U. S. 
Army. Doing a better job than any of us 
on the battlefield— and DID YOU know? 
He's married to RENIE METZ— remember 
her?" 

"Remember her, of course I do!" 
"Sure," said Don, "he's always had his 
heart set on her — and they have two chil- 
dren — perfect images of Frank." 

Don and I departed, and I made my way 
thru' the crowds. I was bound I was going 



to see Bob Munson — couldn't miss that. So 
I saw this policeman — or rather police wom- 
an — for that's what they have now over 
here. I approached the tall, thin, nice-look- 
ing girl and thought how well she wore her 
uniform. 'Could you tell me? — NORMA 
WELLS! Of all places to find you. What 
on earth are you doing here?" 

Still as jovial and in that carefree way, 
'Well, what are YOU doing here? They 
said my husband was missing in action— 
but I didn't believe it — so I came over here 
to check up — and I found him, too." 

I laughed and said, "But what about the 
uniform ycu're sporting?" "Well, I liked the 
country over here — so decided to stay," said 
Norma. "Oh, by the way, could you tell me 
where I can find Bob Munson?" I asked. 

"Sure," answered Norma, "I'll get you 
right up in the front row." 

"Am I ever lucky!" I said. Norma had 
to go on her way, so I saw Bob on the 
stage and afterwards went out back to see 
him. Finally, I caught up with him and 
he was as much surprised to see me as I 
him. So, this morning Bob took me to see 
how well the U. S. were keeping up the 
schools. 

"But first," I said, "I want to congrat- 
ulate you on that capture." 

"Oh, that was nothing," said Bob, "give 
all the credit to JOE HAIGH for the in- 
formation he gave me." 

"Joe Haigh?" I asked. 

"Sure — remember he joined the Navy 
while still in high school and the Navy 
used him as a spy in Japan." 

"We certainly get around, don't we?" 
I said. We entered this large building and 
I could hear the click of typewriters. And 
who should it be— but LESTER SHAW 
and ROGER KING. "Why Gabriel and 
Budget!" I cried. 

"But wait 'till you see the rest," they 
said, and at this moment, a spinsterish- 
looking woman came from another room 
and sternly, "I'd like to see my two pri- 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



15 



vate secretaries, Mr. Shaw and Mr. King, 
please!" I couldn't hold back the laugh— 
and very crossly, "I'll have it qui — why 
BETTY DAMON!" and all that old-maidish 
look dropped. 

"I heard you were head of all the schools 
in Berlin," I said, "but I never thought 
you'd turn out to be an old-maid!" 

"Old maid, nothing!" chimed in her 
brother, "Millie just has to look like that to 
impress the school children." We all laughed 
and sat down to a good old-fashioned hen- 
party. Of course Bob knew about SHIRLEY 
KNIGHT — she was a Navy Nurse and dur- 
ing Bob Munson's act of capturing the Jap 
Navy — she had killed 33 Japanese. A second 
Molly Pitcher, they called her now. 

"And," cried Milly, "did you know about 
JACK O'BRIEN? Well, he still worked 
for Mr. Crone during the war, and LOR- 
ENA NIETSCHE was working for her fa- 
ther and since they lived side by side, 
they decided to go into partnership. And 
guess what! They've done over the whole 
town of Williamsburg — you'd never know 
our old town." 

"Oh, but did you hear about BILL BIS- 
BEE?" asked Lester. 

"No, but I imagine he raised chickens as 
he always wanted," I answered. 

"Chickens!" cried Budget, "He's running 
the biggest night club in Berlin — of course 
he made all his money on chickens, though." 

"No kidding," I said, "I always thought 
Bill had a hidden desire for women and 
dancing." 

"Well, let's go around the city and see 
all the sights," I suggested — so the five of 
us started out and there was the smoothest 
looking uniform I'd ever seen — must be a 
major, I thought. The person turned quickly 
and gracefully mounted her horse. "My, 
that face looks familiar," I told the other 
four. 

"Why, don't you even know your oli 
classmate, JEAN CRONE?" 

"Well, my goodness, girls will be boys," 
I thought. 

"Gee, I'm hungry" — said Bob, "let's drop 
in here for a bite to eat." What should their 



specialty be but apple pie and ice cream a 
la Shaw. Just as we walked in the owner 
raised her right hand, "Heil Hitler." I 
wondered if she didn't know that the war 
was over so I looked again and who should 
it be but MARY BOWKER. We ordered 
the pie and ice cream, and Mary said, "Yes, 
everyone is crazy about Edna's home-made 
pies." Edna's?" I cried, you don't mean 
EDNA SHAW from Burgy?" "I certainly 
do," said Mary, "she's the best cook in 
Germany." 

"Well, sit down and tell me more," I said. 
"How about GENEVA GRAVES — what 
ever happened to her?" 

"Oh, you remember how much she liked 
the Navy and the water. Well, she set 
sail on a Bickford lifeboat and has never 
returned." "How awful," I said. "There's 
nothing really awful about it," said Mary, 
"for you know CAROLYN EMERSON and 
HELEN CARVER liked the water, too— so 
they decided to be mermaids for the rest 
of their lives and they tell me that Geneva 
is safe and sound." 

She went on, "Did you know about 
MARIAN CULVER and FROSTINE 
GRAVES? They are both in Japan estab- 
lishing new schools. And in the Daily 
Hampshire Gazette which I get by Clipper 
every day I saw that JUNE COLBURN 
had become a full professor at Smith Col- 
lege." 

"Is that so!" I exclaimed. "And DON 
CAMPBELL— what about—?" 

Mary broke in before I could finish, "It's 
Don and Dot now, you know. He dis- 
covered some chemical process during the 
war; made heaps of money." 

"Well, Mr. Foster should be pleased," I 
chuckled. "Well, I must be going on my 
way." I said good-bye to them all and 
started out the door only to be grabbed 
by the door-tender, "Say, how about paying 
your bill — how come you think YOU can 
get away with it?" she yelled at me. 

"Why, I forgot. Here you are." I handed 
her the money and looked up into the 
face of CHARLOTTE OTIS. "Why, Char- 
lotte!" I said, "Fancy seeing you here!" 

"What's so fancy about it?" gruff ed 
Continued on Page 34 



16 



THE TATTLER 



Class Will 



We, the intelligent and dignified "twenty 
eight," being the class of 1943 of Williams- 
burg High School and having completed 
our four year course as steadfast troopers 
in the just cause of our Alma Mater, do 
hereby proclaim this to be our last will 
and testament. We do bequeath and grant 
those possessions and treasures which to 
us have meant so much. 

To the faculty as a whole we leave our 
thanks for bearing with us these four years, 
and our sincere appreciation for all they 
have taught — how much we remember re- 
mains to be seen. 

We leave Mr. Merritt some equipment for 
for a physical education program for the 
new year. 

We leave Miss Dunphy one Jersey cow 
so the daily trips to Packard's at noon 
will not be necessary. 

We leave to Miss Lawe, the class money 
so she can take a class trip to Michigan. 

As a special request Miss Barrus and 
Miss Lawe give to Miss Webber their hand 
grenades and guns, which they often felt 
tempted to use but never did. 

We bequeath Miss Barrus a straight 
Jacket to slip into before beginning class 
with the hope that it will control her freq- 
uent gestures. 

Miss Merritt is willed a mask to cover 
her grin which always escapes when some 
student pulls a prank. 

We wish to leave Mr. Foster a $4.98 Sears 
Roebuck footstool. By so doing we hope to 
conserve his desk drawer which he often 
found as an excellent substitute. 

To the class of '44 we bequeath the honor 
of becoming Seniors. (Of course we feel 
that we have taken all honors for the most 
dignified class that the school will ever 
have, although we hope they will keep up 
our excellent record.) 

To the class of '45 we have reserved seats 
in the Junior room with rental charges be- 
ginning next September to be paid to Jean 
Crone, Treasurer. Extra charge is to be 
made for seats at the windows which serve 
as a baseball stadium. 



Our over-abundant store of knowledge is 
left to the class of '46 with the privilege of 
using it whenever the occasion demands. 

Betty Damon wills her versatility and 
enthusiasm to Shirley Hathaway. 

Millard Hathaway and Jack O'Brien leave 
their frequent trips to 'Hamp and the 
"Maples" to Alfred Judd. 

Roger King wishes to leave his curly 
hair to the Loomis boys. Roger suggests 
they use McHortons Aid to Wavy Hair, 
as he always found it an excellent prepara- 
tion. 

To Honey Harlow, Helen Carver be- 
queaths her title of man hater. 

Jean Crone wishes to will her "Quiz Kid 
Intelligence" to Stewart Chapin. 

Edna Shaw leaves a bit of her serious- 
ness to Rita Lupien. Even a bit might help. 

Arlene Sabo wishes to have her place 
as an honor student filled by Barbara Cone. 

To Margaret Ryan is left Shirley Knight's 
admiration of the name Bob. 

Lorena Nietchie leaves her 'faithful' 
timepiece to anyone who wishes to miss at 
least 15 minutes of first period class. 

Irene Metz leaves her executive ability 
to Kenneth West. 

Marion Culver bequeaths hei* love of 
Math to Buddy Jarvis. He could use it, 
perhaps. 

Robert Munson and Donald Wickland 
leave their weekly excursions to the 5 and 
10 cent store to anyone who can buy so 
little and talk to the clerks as long as 
they do. 

Donald Campbell wills four inches of his 
height to Fred Healy, and Joe Haigh 
leaves ten lbs. of his weight to Felix 
Brisbois. 

The use of Frank Munson's tropical 
green motorcycle is bequeathed to Marion 
Warner with the hope that she can travel 
to Westhampton on it as often as he did. 

Betty Lou Harlow, Norma Wells, Geneva 
Graves, and Mary Bowker wish to leave 
their correspondence to those "certain ones" 
in the armed forces to Clarice Graves, 
Dorothy Pringle, Ruth Munson, and Roberta 
Clark. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 



Lester Shaw's ability to make such chem- 
ical conglomerations as he always did, is 
left to some future chemistry student. 
Note: It is by some miracle that the lab- 
oratory still stands. 

Frostine Graves leaves her place as 
Packards right-hand girl to John Belk. 

Carolyn Emerson, June Colburn, and 
William Bisbee wish to leave their places 
in P. D. Class to three new recruits next 
year. They advise you as follows: Stick to 
your belief (it'll probably be wrong any- 
way) and study lessons frequently. Tests 
are never given when you know your lesson. 

Charlotte Otis and Mildred Shaw will 
their respective seats in the Senior room 
to Phyllis Granger and Merton Nye. These 



girls do not sit near each other, thus they 
hope to avert the constant conversation and 
admiring looks of this couple. 

We draw this our last Will and Testa- 
ment to a close, since we have bequeathed 
our possessions and treasure to those here- 
tofore mentioned. 

Given at the auditorium of the Williams- 
burg High School this 24th day of June, in 
below we hereby affix our signature. 

Signed The Senior Class of 1943. 
Witnesses: 

Snuffy Smith 
Lana Turner 
Rommel 



Class Poem 



CLIMB THO' THE ROCKS BE RUGGED 

Climb tho' the rocks be rugged, 
Climb tho' Fortune is ill, 
Climb with a smile for every mile 
'Til you reach the top of the hill. 

And if you choose a pathway 
That hasn't been traversed for long, 
The ruts will be rough and it'll be tough; 
So keep a-humming this song: 

Climb tho' the rocks be rugged 
And press with vigor on. 
Keep hope and courage in your heart, 
When clouds have hid the sun. 

Remember that might is needed 
To ascend the Mountain of Life; 
And in order to reach a certain goal 
It takes fortitude and strife. 

Victory is gained through efficiency, 
And Glory achieved through pain; 
And it takes a very strong character 
To accomplish each definite aim. 

So remember the arrow that leads to the right, 
And as you whistle along, 
May you climb tho' the rocks be rugged — 
Forever be your song. 

EDNA SHAW '43 



18 



THE TATTLER 



Class Grinds 



My task is to put into rime 
The story of our class and time; 
I've worked at it hard and long, 
And this is how each fits into my song. 

Irene's the president of our class, 

A likeable and pleasing lass; 

She has friends a thousand fold and more 

And aspires to the Naval Air Corps. 

Helen has hair and eyes of brown; 
She's a resident of a near-by town. 
And when a lad in khaki passes by 
He's almost certain to catch her eye. 

Buster's a lad from Chesterfield, West; 
And on Tuesday and Thursday the lab he 

would mess. 
In Speech class on Friday a speech he 

would say, 
And make the class laugh for the rest of 

the day. 

Don Campbell's a Haydenville boy of eigh- 
teen, 
And to Main St. he'd go to see her dear 

queen. 
But now he has gone into the Army, you 

know, 
To fight for our country and help lick our 

foe. 

A pretty and popular girl is she 
And just as charming as she can be, 
She's noted for having lots of beaus, 
But her lessons, Millie always knows. 

He is quite short, and has dark brown hair, 
For school and studies he does not care. 
On a motorcycle the girls he will court; 
We all think Frank is a very good sport. 

Don Wiekland's quite a romeo; 
To the Chesterfield dances he did go. 
Lately, an attraction there has been 
Down in Woolworth's 5 and 10! 

Arlene is a girl of seventeen; 
To be a nurse is her one dream. 
She thinks Connecticut is a very nice state, 
And a lad in the Air Corps is her favorite 
date. 



Billy is a rather quiet lad; 
When 3 o'clock comes he is very glad. 
His hair has a tendency to curl, 
And would you believe he has a girl? 

Jackie's a boy full of humor and wit, 
And with all the girls he makes quite a hit. 
He has dark wavy hair, and a gleam in 

his eye, 
And in basketball his motto is — "Do or die." 

We're very proud of this little lad 
Who was always happy, and never sad; 
But Joe's in the Navy now, you know, 
He, also, is going to help lick our foe. 

Jean is tall, with raven black hair; 
If there's a joke to play, she is right there. 
She's a member of high Pro Merito, 
And hopes to be a scientist, you know. 

From South Street comes this little lass 
Who is glad when there is no Speech class. 
In class meetings Frostine has her say, 
And a teacher she hopes to be, some day. 

Down from Conway comes a girl 
Whose hair is dark and always curls; 
Marion is a very quiet lass 
But she caused a riot one day in our Math 
Class. 

June is a member of the debating team 
And is fascinated by the name "Dick", it 

seems, 
She wants very much to go to Smith College 
And we all wish her luck, for we know 

she has knowledge. 

Her last name deals with dreary places. 
Her father's business saves us many paces; 
Geneva likes the name "Don," the best, 
But we will let you guess the rest. 

Bette was our cheerleader, small and spry, 
To help the boys win the games, she did try. 
She hopes some day to be able to go 
To Florida, to see her best beau. 

Bette Lou joined us in our Sophomore Year, 
And by now to us she has grown very dear. 
She receives a letter almost every day 
From her beau in the Army, just who I 
can't say. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 



This girl we admire for her natural curls 
She is very popular among the girls 
Mary simply adores the name "Mac" 
And hopes he will soon be coming back. 



And who can that be? — why it's Roger 

King! 
For girls he never did much care, 
But in entertaining, he has done his share. 



Tall, dark, and handsome — guess wh'i? 
He always does what he says he will do, 
Bob's very handy with an automobile 
And likes to putter around a great deal. 



Charlotte aspires to a nursing career 
A fine one she'll be, never fear. 
Tall and pretty and full of fun, 
She's thought by all as a "number one. 



Millard's a boy of seventeen, 
Around the "Maples" he can be seen. 
He goes to the movies every Saturday night, 
And thinks Donna Hobbs is just about right. 



Norma is known as one of our wits 
As shown by her laughing and giggling fits. 
To a soldier named Art she's long been true, 
We wish her good luck when the war is thru. 



Carolyn has a knowledge of milking cows 
The Army is the best branch of the service 

she vows, 
A good commercial student is she 
And a secretary she hopes to be. 



Her watch we guess is never right 

This girl who lives on a South Street height 

From business or landscape Lorena will 

choose 
A career in which she cannot lose. 



Edna Shaw hails from Cummington, 
She never stops till her work is done, 
A nurse she hopes to be some day, 
And we hope that luck will come her way. 

This fellow is famous for the jokes he does 
spring, 



There's no need for a rime about me 
For I am here for all to see. 
And now my song is sung 
As well as I could I have done. 
Our days together are almost thru 
So — here's a cheer and a toast to a merry 
crew. 



20 



THE TATTLER 



Class of 1944 




Front Row: M. Deane, M. Ryan, J. Polwrek, D. Harry, C. Graves, C. Brooks, M. Johnson 

Second Row: R. Clark, A. Matrishon, P. Granger, M. Warner, R. Munson, M. Syl- 
vester, R. Carver. 

Third Row: R. Toski, M. Nye, N. Bates, J. Stone, F. Healy, J. McAllister, R. Des- 
marais, T. Toski, E. Sincage. 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Donald Harry TREASURER, Clarice Graves 

VICE-PRESIDENT, John Polwrek SECRETARY, Charlotte Brooks 

HISTORIAN, Margaret Ryan 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



21 



Class of 1945 




Front Row: K. Allaire, R. LaCasse, B. Purrington, M. L. Bisbee, E. Sanderson, L. 
Newell. 

Second Row: R. Mollison, B. Batura, S. Golash, B. Cone, M. Brisbois, E. Lloyd, P. 
Rhoades, B. Cole. 

Third Row: W. Jarvis, C. Thayer, N. Damon, D. Pringle, N. Hathaway, L. Packard. 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Mary Lou Bisbee TREASURER, Barry Purrington 

VICE-PRESIDENT, Eva Sanderson SECRETARY, Ruth LaCasse 

HISTORIAN, Louise Newell 



22 



THE TATTLER 



Class of 1946 







Front Row: J. Hillenbrand, A. Golash, E. Lynch, S. Hathaway, C. Warner, T. Har- 
low, M. Warner, C. Smart, R. Bowker, H. Sylvester. 

Second Row: I. Nye, B. Kulash, S. Crone, L. Jones, J. Moran, E. Golash, F. Beals, 
R. Ice, H. Clark. 

Third Row: R. Loomis, E. Everett, J. Belck, R. Dana, R. Loomis, E. Lezynski. 

Fourth Row: L. Bates, F. Brisbois, K. West, R. Lesure, M. Healy, R. Daniels, S. Chapin. 



CLASS OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT, Marshall Warner TREASURER, Theodora Harlow 

VICE-PRESIDENT, Clifton Smart SECRETARY, Cara Warner 

HISTORIAN, Shirley Hathaway 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



Editorials 



BE HONEST 



A quality inherent to lasting success is 
honesty. Whether he be mason or minister, 
bricklayer or banker, clerk or cortier, he 
who feels his way by unclean practices 
never realizes the lasting beauty of honest 
accomplishment. 

The first essential is — be true to yourself. 
Worse than losing others' faith in you, is 
the loss of belief in yourself. Your self- 
respect is lost and a continuation of the 
policy means loss of the respect of others. 
A person without self-respect is hopeless 
in the eyes of the worlJ. 

A cheater tries to see the easiest way out. 
Whether it is playing an unfair hand in 
cards or whether it's hoarding articles that 
are threatened to be placed among rationed 
goods; whether it is making up false ex- 
cuses to your parents or cheating on an 
examination of any nature; if he keeps it 
up his inevitable outcome is failure. No one 
ever gained permanent happiness or suc- 
cess by dishonest or illegal "shortcuts." 

It is of small significance whether it is 
you that are doing the bad work or whether 
you are helping a friend to do it. In the 
first you are cheating yourself — robbing 
yourself of a chance at clean opportunities, 
and blinding the public to your good qual- 
ities. In the latter you are deceiving your 
friend. In teaching a person to work un- 
fairly you are as much to blame as he 
himself. 

And one more point. Be fair to others. 
Don't be hasty in forming opinions of 
strangers because they are a little different 
in customs and appearance. In addition to 
treating them unfairly, you may lose 
friends whom you might wish you had in 
the future. "Judge not according to the 
appearance, but judge righteously." 

And whether you are leading a simple 
complacent life in a country villa or wheth- 
er you are marching on the front in some 
war-torn land, remember the words of 
Abraham Lincoln when he spoke — "Truth 
is your truest friend, no matter what may 
be the circumstances." 



Honest work, fair play, cleanliness of 
body and soul will live forever. They ar« 
aommant factors in a plan for harmonious 
hvmg — a living free from tyranny and op- 
pression. So let us have hope — . 

"I ruth crushed to earth shall rise again. 
The eternal years of God are hers; 
But error, wounded, writhes with pain, 
And lies among its worshippers." 

— Edna Shaw 

SACRIFICE 



In the past few months, more than ever 
before, I've come into contact with the 
word "sacrifi.e." It was used in so many 
different ways that I became confused and 
finally resorted to the dictionary for help. 
I'll have to admit, however, that the defi- 
nitions given there did not clear up the 
doubt in my mind, for I could not see any 
connection between "an offering to God," 
which was one of Webster's definitions, and 
the sacrifices some people say they are 
making when they have to stop driving 
their cars for pleasure. I decided then to 
think back and try to remember what sac- 
rifice had meant to me before. 

Perhaps the first place I came into con- 
tact with the word was in church. Here 
I was taught about the sacrifice of Jesus 
for mankind. As I grew older, and became 
acquainted with baseball terms, I found that 
sacrifice took on another meaning, and often 
meant the winning of the game. In school 
I learned that when a business man sells 
goods at a loss, it is known as a sacri- 
fice, and in our mythology course, victims 
offered to the Gods, were called sacrifices. 
Although these were four different circum- 
stances they all had one thing in common, 
whether in church, sports, business or 
mythology, and that is the giving up or 
offering of one thing for another. I con- 
cluded then that this is what sacrifice had 
always meant to me. 

Then, I began to think about the sacri- 
fices I had heard people talking about. The 
most predominant one seemed to be that 
of giving up pleasure driving. Next, giving 



24 



THE TATTLER 



up of coffee and sugar a.id other rationed 
goods in large quantities. Third, taking so 
mu h out of incomes for taxes. People 
maintained that the giving U p of pleasure 
driving and rationed foods was a sacrifice. 
As for taxes, they argued that so much 
was taken out of their pay — that they had 
just about enough to live on, and they 
di.'.n't see why they had to sacrifice so 
much. I thought then "Can these be con- 
sidered sacrifice??" Oh, it means fewer 
basketball games and movie? to be gone 
to besides having to go on the bus. Especial- 
ly at this time of year the oil rationing 
has hit us hard. But are we the ones who 
are doing the sacrificing? What about the 
fellows whose lives are lost when the tank- 
ers bringing gasoline to us are sunk. We 
are complaining about giving up pleasure 
driving when it may mean another life 
lost. Every time I hear people complain 
about coffee and sugar and butter and meat 
being so hard to get, I think about those 
people in Greece and Poland and other Ger- 
man-occupied countries who are starving. 
Taxes? Of course they're high. But we 
must remember we're in a war which we 
must win. 

I was thinking all of this to myself and 
added, "Maybe these are real sacrifices, 



cnly I've got the wrong light on them." 
And again, "Can these be considered sac- 
rifices?" For a minute I said, "Of course, 
they're sacrifices." Then I began to think 
about other things. About the fellows who 
are giving up their entire way of living 
to go into the armed services and about 
them giving up their lives. I realized then, 
they're not giving up some little thing 
like coffee or sugar, they're giving up the 
greatest thing they can — their lives. I al- 
so realized that we're not the ones who 
are doing the sacrificing. It's kids like 
those hundreds of city boys and girls who 
gave up their summer vacations to do farm 
work. Most of them had never seen a farm 
before. Yet they did their job and they did 
it well. And it's women like the Nurse's 
Aides who give up much of their time 
every week to alleviate the work of the 
already overburdened nurse, and like the 
Red Cross Volunteers who are doing the 
painstaking job of rolling bandages and 
sewing. Theirs isn't as great as the sol- 
diers' sacrifice, yet they're giving their 
best. It's people such as these, giving big 
and little sacrifices, who are helping to 
bring closer the victory which will be 
ours. 

Irene Metz 



Literary 



FORGIVE US OUR TRESPASSES 

A Letter to the People of the World 
from tin- American People : 

You are well aware that you are living 
during one of the greatest and fiercest 
wars of mankind. You realize that this war 
will decide your future and that of your 
children. Remember the old saying: "You 
brought it on yourself?" We Americans, 
some of us, have stopped to think about 
this — and so we can say to you and your 
children — and to our own children — Forgive 
us our trespasses. Forgive us for any part 
we have had in bringing on this war and 
its consequences. 

First, forgive us for our petty human 
actions — for our personal desires, greed, 



and selfishness. For the little quarrels be- 
tween groups that disrupt our daily life — 
the feeling between rich and poor; Catholie 
and Protestant; Jew and Gentile; this group 
and that in church and town life; and for- 
give our small personal feuds. 

Wo recall the bad feelings between labor 
and capital — and are ashamed of the busi- 
ness morals that cause these — the employ- 
er's desire to make money; cut-throat com- 
petition between firms; and the conse- 
quent harmful working conditions for the 
workers. Strikes are effective weapons in 
the hands of workers against unscrupulous 
employers, but when used in essential war 
industries causing a slowing-down of pro- 
duction, it is too bad that they are allowed 
or that they are necessary. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



Our politics are not perfect, they are no 
cleaner in places than some of yours. We 
should be ashamed when we hear of city 
politics causing the top men to make money 
from the education system — when the tax 
payers are paying to have their children 
well educated. This happened in Lowell, 
Massachusetts. Why should it be necessary 
to question and prosecute the morals and 
practices of a man recommended by the 
president for a responsible position? Yet 
this happened to Edward J. Flynn whom 
President Roosevelt recommended in his 
message to Congress, Jan. 1943, for minister 
to Australia. Forgive us for the many little 
under-handed practices between or among 
the various political parties represented in 
our government. 

Forgive us for any unnecessary or ineffi- 
cient labor, rationing, or other things which 
piay a part in this war. The shortage of 
workers in plants where they are needed is 
drawn to our attention — but even more so, 
the shortage of help in towns and cities. On 
the other side we see a jammed, overcrowd- 
ed capital. "But it's necessary," you say, 
"those workers were needed." And then you 
read Senator Byrd's report on the corrup- 
tion of the office systems there — because a 
man's salary depends on the number of 
secretaries or clerks he employs, he gets 
good pay for 50 when 10 could do the work. 

We have to admit that rationing is neces- 
sary, but some people feel that New Eng- 
land is taking more than her share of it. 
Forgive the grumbles and gripes set up 
about the things we are deprived of, when 
most of you are deprived of so much more 
and didn't have as much as we in the first 
place. 

In the paper we read of bad conditions 
in Springfield, Mass. — due to mothers and 
fathers both working in defense factories. 
Children are actually locked out of their 
homes until the parents' return. "It's the 
parent's fault," you say. It's our fault that 
parents are allowed to do such things. Even 
worse are the housing conditions in some 
sections. And then we see pictures of the 
faults of government housing in 'Life' mag- 
azine. 

Forgive us for the mistakes made in con- 



tacts with you of other countries. The 
trouble with Argentina over beef and wheat 
comes to our attention — Argentina was still 
doubtful of our intentions when Western 
Hemisphere solidarity was and is neces- 
sary for the war effort. 

Many people contribute this war to the 
Treaty of Versailles — the bad feelings it 
caused on the part of the German people. 
Perhaps, we should have had more to do 
with the terms of that peace. The League 
of Nations failed. Experts give many rea- 
sons. We are aware that we did not do our 
part. True, our President Wilson originated 
the League, but we did not join. 

Could we have helped to divert this war 
in any way in the past 10 or 20 years? 
Should we have intervened in Germany's 
rearmament? Is it true we were unaware 
of it, or did we merely choose to ignore 
it? Should we have intervened between 
Italy and Ethiopia? Would this have stop- 
ped the growth of Fascism in Italy? Should 
we have intervened between China and 
Japan? Should we have done more than 
send China supplies? Would we be at war 
with Japan now if we had declared war 
then? Should we have aided in Spain's 
Civil War? Would our intervention have 
diverted this war in any way ,so that you 
of Spain could rebuild more quickly? 

Why did we send scrap-iron to Japan? 
Did we have any way of knowing it would 
come back at us in this way? Was it our 
own greed for trade and profit that blind- 
ed us to what was coming? 

Why did some people grumble about 
Lend-Lease? Just what is wrong in this 
system? Are we sending so much to other 
countries that we will be unable to defend 
ourselves sufficiently? Or are these supplies 
in the hands of other countires now de- 
fending us? 

Last, but not least, forgive us for the 
uncleanliness of our own house. Politics 
have already been mentioned. There are the 
problems also, of crime, delinquency, bad 
housing, and the health of our people. A 
large percentage of our men and boys were 
excluded from the draft because they were 
not physically fit. 

Forgive us for the inefficiency in various 



26 



THE TATTLER 



branches within our country. Our over- 
crowded capital, Washington, is an ex- 
ample — also, housing conditions, and labor 
conditions, and labor troubles. A coal strike 
in a country short of fuel, and in a coun- 
try which furnishes most of the coal for 
the Allied Nations war effort. 

Could we have prevented war with the 
Japanese Empire if we'd taken steps years 
ago? "We were warned" says Ambassador 
Grew. The recently published White-book 
declares that the State Department, Army, 
and Navy are inefficient; and that Pearl 
Harbor was not really a "stab in the back." 
There were rumors of drunken officers at 
Pearl Harbor on the morning of December 
7th, 1941. Are these examples of vast in- 
efficiency? 

Forgive us for any part propaganda 
plays in the managing of our war effort. 
We should not be so ignorant as to believe 
and pass on rumors, yet so many of us do! 

Now stop and think, have any of these 
things played a part in bringing on this 
war? To some extent, we feel that they 
have. And what about in your own coun- 
tries — you people of the world? What have 
you done to bring this on yourselves? Per- 
haps not as mu?h, for some of you — per- 
haps much more, for a lot of you. 

But we, the American peple — are saying 
to you millions who are suffering, and to 
you many millions more who will suffer 
because of World War II — Forgive Us Our 
Trespasses. 

— Arlene Sabo '43 

* * * 

"POSTHUMOUSLY AWARDED" 

There was a burst of machine gun fire. 
The fireworks had started. Jim and his 
companions jumped for a foxhole. Jim felt 
behind him for his rifle. He picked it up 
and passed his fingers lovingly over it's 
stock. It was a good gun. Jim had cut six 
notches in the stock. These accounted for 
the six Japs that Jim had knocked over. 

He heard a shout behind him. The Japs 
were closing in. Jim hurriedly loaded his 
rifle. He peeked out over the top. Zing!!! 
They almost got him that time. Again he 
peeked out. This time he raised his rifle. 
One Jap gone. The Japs were falling right 



and left. Jim hit another and another. 
Then he ran out of ammunition. 

What could he do? He glanced down into 
the foxhole. His two companions lay there, 
one dead, the other dying. Jim saw red. He 
looked around. No ammunition. Well, he 
could use that grenade in his pocket and 
then hope for the best. 

He crawled back to the top and glanced 
down once more at his two companions; 
then he pulled the pin and tossed the gren- 
ade. With satisfaction he watched the ex- 
plosion of that grenade. He counted at least 
ten dead Japs. 

After crawling down into the foxhole 
to wait for the inevitable, he slowly cut 
thirteen more notches on his rifle. That 
made nineteen Japs. 

Nineteen Japs!! 

As he sat there staring at those notches, 
he heard a whirring noise and jumped, 
too late. 

He dropped where he was and lay still 
with his face in the black mud and his 
hand on his rifle. 

C. Emerson '43 



DUTY FOR ALL 



1 awcke in the morn with the shining of 

the sun. 
And the chirp of the bird as he sang, 

"Morn's Begun." 
I dashed to the window to smell the sweet 

air, 
Not a worry in the world nor even a care. 

As I gazed at the sky and the fields below, 
I tho't of the boys who left this to go 
To the call of our country so brave and 

so free. 
Some on distant lands and some on the 

sea. 

What would it be like when they all re- 
turned ? 

That is OUR duty we all have learned. 

So we'll watch the sky and toil all the 
while 

For peace once again when they're home 
with a smile. 

— Elsa Lloyd 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 



"LIVE RICHLY" 

In order to enjoy natural beauty we 
must develop within ourselves an ability 
to appreciate it. 

The late Lorado Taft, the great sculptor, 
told this story: 

"He and his family were spending a few 
days in a country home. One evening they 
were all enjoying the wonderful sunset 
when the little neighbor girl who was as- 
sisting in serving their supper and listen- 
ing in on the conversation, asked: 

'Please, may I go home for a few 
minutes' 

'Why do you want to go home?' 

'To show the folks the sunset.' 

'They'll see it, won't they?' 

'No, they won't, for there's nobody there 
to show them." 

A thing proves appealing to us only 
when there is something in us that reaches 
out to appreciate it. When we become too 
involved in problems of the social world, 
political worries, and when we limit our 
scope of thinking to material things it is 
dangerous to our character. We forget the 
simple little things of life. We do not see 



beyond our own narrow selfish desires and 
are often too ignorant to realize we have 
missed anything. 

Maybe we think we are happy in our 
ignorance, but truly, we are not. The door 
to great beauties and pleasures, and the 
door that leads us to real, intelligent hap- 
piness has been closed. We are blind to the 
facts concerning our own source of being 
— that the God of Nature made us, too. 

So take a little time out each day to 
cultivate the pleasures around you. 

Enjoy the birds and bees. 

Read poetry on the great out-of-doors. 

Show interest in habits of Nature. 

Go hiking and camping. 

Make good people your friends. 

Show an appreciation for music. 

Work with an honest will. 

Live well. 

'Forget not His benefits.' 

Remember: 

Folks who love beauty create beauty in 
the things about them. 

EDNA SHAW '43 
Edna Shaw '43 



Application for Membership Form X335752Y9 

NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO 
UNIONIZED WINDOW WASHERS (N.F.P.C.U.W.W.) 

Name Age Date 

(1) If you have previously worked for an affiliated corporation fill in form 
32994892Z2Y section two. If, however, your former employer was a subdivision of a 
contracted firm, fill out form 497729805P3L on sheet six. 

(2) How many square feet of window space have you cleaned in the past five (5) 

years? sq. ft. (If you washed stained windows put that 

under sub-contracts on sheet 6 form 39850K6L3P). Taking it for granted that you 

use yoir own equipment, how long does it take you to clean one (1) window? 

(If you don't carry a watch, put that under Sec. 3 Paragraph 9 form 34799203P under 
"advisable conditions for employees." 

What brand of soap do you use? (If your brand 

is made by a co. WEST of Chicago state in that in Section 1 Article 7 Paragraph 3 
on sheet 8, form 729457920P5LK. Now, fill out form 37720692R Section 9, Article 2, 
Paragraph 3 on intravenous methods of rehabilitation of uninhabited dwellings of less 
than three stories. 
N.F.P.C.U.W.W. P.O. Form X335752YO JOHN BELCK 



'c8 



THE TATTLER 



Newspaper Staff 




First Row: F. Graves, B. L. Harlow, B. Damon, W. Bisbee, T. Toski, M. Shaw, J. Crone. 
Crone. 

Second Row: Miss Lawe, M. Deane, M. L. Bisbee, I. Metz, A. Sabo, R. Toski. 

Third Row: M. Healy, F. Healy, R. Munson, J. O'Brien, R. Desmarais, B. Purrington. 



The Inkspots, student newspaper, was published three times this year with William 
Bisbee as Editor-in-Chief. It preesnted student activities, sports, literary material, 
and art. Miss Lawe served as faculty adviser. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



29 



Tattler Staff 




First Row: M. Shaw, E. Shaw, I. Metz, B. L. Harlow, B. Damon. 

Second Row: Miss Barrus, J. Polwrek, C. Otis, A. Sabo, J. Crone, D. Harry. 



Editor-in-Chief, Irene Metz '43 

Assistant Editors, Jean Crone '43, Arlene Sabo '43 

Business Manager, Bette Lou Harlow '43 

Assistants, Betty Damon '43, Charlotte Otis '43 

Alumni Editor, Mildred Shaw '43 

Exchange Editor, Donald Harry '44 

Sports Editor, John Polwrek '44 

Literary Editor, Edna Shaw '43 

Joke Editor, Betty Damon '43 

Faculty Advisor, Annetta Barrus 



30 



THE TATTLER 



Forensic 




First Row: J. Colburn, D. Harry, A. Sabo, E. Shaw. 

Second Row: Miss Barrus, B. L. Harlow, P. Granger, W. Bisbee. 



Forensic activities were of a necessity 
cut to a considerable degree this year. The 
debaters were able to participate as usual 
in the Valley League debates but the tour- 
naments, both, state and local, were omitted. 
The debaters split evenly winning five and 
losing five at the meetings in Westfield 
and South Hadley. Opponents included 
Northampton, South Hadley, Hopkins, Hol- 
yoke and Westfield. The teams were handi- 
capped by the loss of Arlene Sabo in mid- 
season, whose place was very ably filled 
by Bette Lou Harlow. 

Other debaters were Donald Harry, Wil- 
liam Bisbee and June Colburn. 



This year credit was given to orators 
for non-tournament speaking. Four orators 
presented declamations at an assembly 
and Eastern Star program. 

June Colburn gave No Greater Love; 
Phyllis Granger presented Jane; Bette Lou 
Harlow White Lilacs; and Arlene Sabo 
delivered an original speech Forgive Us 
Our Trespasses. 

For the year awards were made as fol- 
lows: degrees of merit and keys to June 
Colburn, Bette Lou Harlow and William 
Bisbee; degree of merit to Donald Harry 
and an emerald-jeweled key to Arlene Sabo. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



31 



Pro Merito 




First Row: J. Crone, R. Munson, J. Polwrek, I. Metz, A. Sabo, M. Shaw. 

Second Row: D. Harry, B. Damon, A. Matrishon, C. Brookes S. Knight, J. Colburn, 
E. Shaw, C. Graves. 



The Pro Merito Society of 1943 consists of 14 members, eight Seniors and six Juniors. The 
members are as follows: 



SENIORS 
Irene Metz — President 
Arlene Sabo — Vice-President 
Jean Crone — Secretary 
June Colburn 
Bette Damon 
Shirley Knight 
Edna Shaw 
Mildred Shaw 

JUNIORS 
John Polwrek — President 
Ruth Munson — Vice-President 
Charlotte Brooks — Secretary 
Clarice Graves 
Donald Harry 
Agnes Matrishon 



Due to the gas and rubber shortage the 
Pro Merito Society was unable to hold a 
zone meeting as it had the previous year 
in Belchertown. 

In a February meeting of the Junior 
and Senior Pro Meritos it was decided to 
continue to have two separate organiza- 
tions each with their own officers. The 
officers were elected in this meeting as 
above. 

An assembly was held on April 18 for 
the dual purpose of bringing to the students 
an understanding of the Pro Merito Society 
and for celebrating Patriot's Day. Both 
Juniors and Seniors participated. This as- 
sembly closed the activities of the Pro 
Merito Societies for this year. 



32 



THE TATTLER 



Baseball Team 




First Row: D. Bates, C. Thayer, N. Damon, R. Toski, J. McAllister, F. Healy, E. 
Lezynski. 

Second Row: J. Polwrek, T. Toski, D. Harry, S. Chapin, M. Warner, L. Bates. 



Fifteen candidates reported to Coach 
Russell Luce who succeeded Edward Ames 
now serving in the U. S. Navy. Coach Luce 
has done a fine job in training the younger 
and new players. Many of the positions 
are being held down by the younger play- 
ers who are making a great showing in 
the games played up to the time of this 
report. Williamsburg has a vastly im- 
proved team over last year's, and has won 



four and l~st one to date. 

Williamsburg High is playing independ- 
ent ball this season due to transportation 
difficulties. Williamsburg has games sched- 
uled with Huntington, Sanderson, East- 
hampton, Smith School, and possibly North- 
ampton High. Williamsburg hopes to have 
a successful season next year as all mem- 
bers of this year's team will be on hpnd 
to play next year. 



SUMMARY OF GAMES 



Williamsburg 


10 


Clarke School 


6 


Williamsburg 


4 


Clarke School 


3 






(13 innings) 


Williamsburg 


1 


Sanderson Acad. 


6 


Williamsburg 


8 


Ashfield 


6 


Williamsburg 


10 


Huntington 


s 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



33 



Basketball Team 




First Row: T. Toski, J. Polwrek, J. O'Brien, Capt. F. Healy, T. Toski. 
Second Row: J. McAllister, N. Damon, M. Warner, M. Healy, L. Lezynski. 
Cheerleaders: Betty Damon, Marion Sylvester, D. Hobbs (missing). 



The Williamsburg High Basketball team 
of '42 and '43 had a fairly successful 
season winning nine and losing twelve. 
Fifteen candidates reported to Coach Ed- 
ward Ames who did a fine job in develop- 
ing the young and unexperienced players. 
The Burgy Boys would undoubtedly have 
had a better season if the Franklin League, 
of which Williamsburg has been a member, 
had continued as before. As a result of its 
dropping, the boys were forced to play many 
teams out of their class but they made fine 
showings in all games played against these 
teams. Williamsburg High received an Hon- 
orary Invitation to participate in the Small 
High School Tournament held at M.S.C. but 
due to war time conditions the affair was 
canceled. 

Capt. Jack O'Brien and Bob Toski were 
among the ten highest scorers in Western 
Mass. Capt. Jack O'Brien placed third with 



235 points, and Toski placed seventh with 
210 points. 

Williamsburg High won the Town Cham- 
pionship for the first time in five years, 
taking two out of three games from the 
"All Stars." The "All Stars" were composed 
of former Alumni players of Williamsburg 
High. Williamsburg High should have a 
successful team next year as only Capt. 
Jack O'Brien will be lost through gradua- 
tion. 



SUMMARY 


' OF 


GAMES PLAYED 




Williamsburg 


21 


Huntington 


54 


Williamsburg 


27 


Alumni 


26 


Williamsburg 


6 


Easthampton 


56 


Williamsburg 


38 


Rosary 


29 


Williamsburg 


33 


Cummington 


31 


Williamsburg 


25 


Easthampton 


48 


Williamsburg 


13 


Smith Academy 


38 



34 



THE TATTLER 



Williamsburg 28 

Williamsburg 83 

Williamsburg 39 

Williamsburg 28 

Williamsburg 52 

Williamsburg 27 

Williamsburg 22 

Williamsburg 30 

Williamsburg 19 

Williamsburg 23 

Williamsburg 29 

Williamsburg 37 

Williamsburg 32 

Williamsburg 44 



Rosary 26 

Cummington 57 

Sanderson Acad. 25 

Clarke School 52 

Sanderson Acad. 25 

Smith Acadmey 32 

Huntington 33 

Clarke School 54 

South Hadley 25 

South Deerfield 28 

South Hadley 45 

All Stars 35 

All Stars 42 

All Stars 36 



CLASS PROPHECY 

Continued from Page 15 
Charlotte. Some different from high school 
day 3, I thought, going out the door. And 
just as I walked out, I met this grizzly-look- 
ing old man walking in and saying "Come 
wifey, dear" and he took Charlotte by the 
arm. "No wonder she's changed," I said. 

Well, BETTE LOU, I guess my three 
minutes are just about up so I guess I'd 
better say good-bye, but don't forget to 
send me some of those apples from the 
Hathaway Orchard — Millard still runs it, 
doesn't he? Well, keep up the good work 
and don't give in — for I know you'll be the 
second Ginny Simms. Bye! 



Golf 

Bob Toski of Williamsburg High won 
the individual Championship Golf title at 
Lenox as he toured the course in 79. Bob 
edged out Henry Gniadek of Pittsfield who 
had an 83 finishing up in the runner-up 
spot. Toski representing Williamsburg top- 
ped the field of 30 players. He played in 
the tourney two years ago, having a 92 
his first year and finishing second last year 
with an 80. This year he went out in 42, 
but came in on 37 strokes as a birdie on 
the 13th and seven pars in the last nine 
holes helped him cop the individual title. 
Edward Sincage accompanied Bob Toski to 
the tourney and played a good game. 

Par Out 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 4 4—35 

Toski Out 5 4 4 5 4 5 4 5 5—42 

Par In 5 3 4 4 5 3 4 4 4—36 

Toski In 5 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 5—37 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



35 



Alumni Notes 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President — Raymond Bradford 

Vice-President — Edward Foster 

Treasurer — Annetta Barrus 

Secretary — Ethel Mosher Ryan 

Executive Committee — Elizabeth Burke, 
Martin Dunphy, Clarence Larkin, Al- 
bert Mosher, Rita Riley, Austin Snow. 





ALUMNI IN SERVICE 


1915- 


-Leonard Walpole 


U. S. Army 


1916- 


-Thomas Wells, Jr. 


U. S. Army 


1917- 


-Maurice Jenkins 


U. S. Army 




Donald Nash 


U. S. Navy 


1918- 


-Edward Dolan 


U. S. Navy 


1921- 


-Bernard Mansfield 


U. S. Army 


1925- 


-Alvan Barrus 


U. S. Army 




Bruce Nash 


U. S. Navy 




Wilbur Purrington 


U. S. Army 




Robert Smiley 


Army Air Corps 


1927- 


-Ronald Emerick 


U. S. Army 




Robert Tetro 


U. S. Navy 


1928- 


-Walter Utley 


U. S. Army 




Leroy Weeks 


U. S. Army 


1929- 


-James Coogan 


U. S. Army 




Davis Snow 


U. S. Army 


1930- 


-Gordon Nash 


U. S. Army 


1931- 


—Raymond Lee 


U. S. Army 




William Merritt 


U. S. Navy 


1932- 


—Edward Sheean 


Army Air Corps 


1933- 


-R. F. Burke Jr. 


U. S. Navy 


George K.Rustemeyer 


Army Air Corps 


1934- 


-Richard Field 


Army Air Corps 




Chester King 


U. S. Army 




Gilbert Loud U.S. Marine Corps 




Edward Murphy 


U. S. Army 




Nancy Sheean 


A. N. C. 


1935- 


-C. Allen Bisbee 


U. S. Army 




Raymond Bradford 


U. S. Army 




Rodney Galbraith 


Army Air Corps 




Bessie Muraski 


A. N. C. 




Hans Nietsche 


U. S. Army 




Robert Otis 


U. S. Navy 




Catherine Paul 


A. N. C. 




Edwin Russell 


U. S. Army 



1936— Vardic Golash 
Walter Golash 
Francis Packard 
John Walshe 
Howard Wilson 

1937 — Lawrence Corbett 
Edward Fontaine 
William Howe 
Winifred Packard 
Janice Penn 
Wendell Pittsinger 
Vernon West 

1938— Robert Bradley 
Thomas Coogan 
Douglas Fairbanks 

1939— Richard Bates 
Carlton Field 
Adam Golash 
M. Elizabeth Penn 
Frank Soltys 
James Stone 
Raymond Stone 
George Warner 
Phyllis West 

1940— Horace Bartlett 

Raymond Johndrow 
Francis Molloy 
Bernard Murphy 
Ashton Rustemeyer 
William Ryan 
Bernard Sampson 
Winthrop Stone 
Henry Wilson 

1941 — Edward Ames 
Ralph Bates 
Russell Bisbee 
Leo Dymerski 
Wellington Graves 
Harold Hillenbrand 
Frederick King 
Henry Kopka 
Gerald Larkin 
Robert McAllister 
Lucius Merritt Jr. 
Adelbert Roberge 

1942— Michael Batura 
Robert Edwards 
Edward Golash 
John Pavelsyk 
Harry Warner 
David West 



U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

Marine Corps 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Army 

A. N. C. 

Nurse 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

Marine Corps 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Navy 

WAAC 

U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 

Army Air Corps 

Army Air Corps 

WAVES 

U. S. Army 
U. S. Navy 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

Naval Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 



36 



THE TATTLER 



CLASS OF 1942 

Elizabeth Allaire — Clerk, Northampton. 

John Barrus — Roosevelt Field, N. Y. 

Charles Bartlett — North Adams State 
Teachers College. 

Eloise Bartlett — Bates College, Maine. 

Michael Batura — U. S. Navy. 

Ruth Beebe — Northampton Commercial Col- 
lege. 

Sylvia Clary — McCallum's Office, North- 
ampton. 

Doris Dymerski — Typist, Washington, D. C. 

Robert Edwards — U. S. Navy. 

Edward Golash — U. S. Navy. 

Lena Guyette — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Audrey Jones — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Mary Kellogg — New York. 

Amelia Kolosewicz — G. L. Grant, Hayden- 
ville. 

Victoria Michalowski — Mrs. William Mur- 
phy, Jr. 

Josephine Ozierynski — Greenfield Tap & Die 

Thelma Packard — General Electric, Pitts- 
field. 

John Pavelcsyk — U. S. Navy. 

Wilbur Shumway — Aero. Institute of Tech- 
nology, Cal. 

Doris Sincage — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Cecilia Soltys— Greenfield Tap & Die. 
Dorothy Stimson — Cooley Dickinson School 
of Nursing. 

Margaret Stone — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Harry Warner — U. S. Navy. 

Jean Warner — Northampton Commercial 

College. 
David West— U. S. Army. 
Mavis Wickland — Clerk, Northampton. 



ALUMNI BIRTHS 

Son to Marion Sabo Ames, '40 

Son to Richard Ames, '38 

Daughter to Eleanor Wheeler Ballway, '35 

Daughter to John Brequet, '23 

Daughter to Charles Damon, Jr., '32 

Daughter to Catherine Vining Doyle, '35 

Daughter to Doris Sabo Elmes, '39 

Son to Edward C. Foster, '25 

Daughter to Lois Bisbee Gilman, '32 

Son to Ruth Pittsinger Hinton, '32 

Daughter to Marie Allaire Mollison, '34 and 
George Mollison, '34 

Son to Evelyn Russell Payson, '29 

Daughter to Warren Russell, '37 

Daughter to Gertrude King Ranstrom, '34 

Daughter to Clary Snow, '29 

Son to Henry Soltys, '34 

Daughter to Mary Black Ward, '28 



ALUMNI MARRIAGES 

Violet Arnold, '38 to Edwards Gibbs III 

Robert Bisbee, '37, to Dolores Wagner 

Raymond Bradford, '35 to Viola Mason, '34 

Robert Bradley, '38 to Francena Burrows 

Velma Brown, '40 to William Driscoll 

Alice Dansereau, '29 to Paul Scholtz 

Marcia Hobbs, '38 to Richard Graves 

Rita LaFlamme, '39 to Joseph Delia Camera 

Adeline Merritt, '37 to Lionel Lapalm 

Victoria Michaloski, '42 to William Mur- 
phy Jr. 

Robert Otis, '35 to Virginia Ladd 

Helen Rosemarynoski, '38 to Rowland King 

Bernard Sampson, '40 to Barbara Potter 

Sheila Swenson, '36 to Northrup Brown 

Ruth Sylvester, '36 to Noel Scagel 

Walter Utley, '28 to Martha Buckley 

Vernon West, '37 to Constance Ide 



ALUMNI DEATHS 
Elmer Thayer '33 



ALUMNI GRADUATES 
Edward Murphy '34, Holy Cross. 
Russell Bisbee '41, Wentworth College, 
Boston. 



32 THE TATTLER 



Autographs 



Compliments of 


Packard s Soda Snoppe 


Opposite Town Hall 


SCHOOL SUPPLIES, MAGAZINES, GREETING CARDS 


Patent Medicines 


UR OWN ICE CREAM FOUNTAIN AND BOOTH SERVICE 


SMART WEARING APPAREL 


HILL BROS. 


FOR YOUNG MEN 


PRINTED LAWNS FOR 


At Moderate Prices 


SUMMER DRESSES 


Harry Daniel Associates 


SOCKS PAJAMAS 


Northampton, Mass. 


Main Street Northampton 


BEST WISHES 


PAINTS AND WALL PAPER 


TO THE 




CLASS OF 1943 


Pierce s Paint ^tore 


Cohen Bros. 


Telephone 1207 196 Main Street 


NORTHAMPTON 


Northampton 


TODD'S 


NORTHAMPTON 


SWEATERS SPORTSWEAR 


Junior and Misses' Sizes 10-16, 9-15 



HENRY A. BIDWELL 

INSURANCE REAL ESTATE 

Of Every Description 

Bidwell Travel Servics Tours — Hotel Reservations 

NONOTUCK SAVINGS BANK BUILDING 



78 Main Street 
Office Phone 351 



Northampton 
Res. Phone 348 



Manhan Potato Chip Co. 

Inc. 

NORMA LEE CANDIES 

92 King Street 



Telephone 772 



'Hamp 



Hardware, Sporting Goods, 

Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis 

and Camping Items 

^oster-i'arcar Co. 



162 Main Street 
Northampton 



Mass. 



CLASS RINGS JEWELRY 



TROPHIES MEDALS 



E. J. Qare & Son 



112 Main Street 



Northampton 



The E. & J. Cigar Co. 

WHOLESALE 
TOBACCONISTS 



23 Main Street 



Northampton 



LaFleur Brothers 

"THE PAINT PEOPLE" 

PAINTS - WALLPAPER 

45 King Street Tel. 374-M 

Northampton 



Francis L. LaMonta^ne 



PAINTER AND DECORATOR 



Telephone 467-W 12 No. Maple Street 



Florence, Mass. 



Newell Funeral Home 



R. D. NEWELL 



74 King Street 



Northampton 



National 


GOOD SHOES 


Shoe Repairing 


Reasonably Priced 
Correctly Fitted 


John Mateja, Prop. 




15 Masonic Street Tel. 826-W 


David Boot Shop 




221 Main Street 


Northampton, Mass. 


Northampton Mass. 


H. G. Stanton 


Woodworth 
Beauty Salon 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE 


O. J. Bonneau, Prop. 


West Chesterfield, Mass. 


200 Main St. 




PHONE 2390 


Telephone 2523 


Northampton, ,Mass. 



Compliments of R Friend 



Gannon & Forsander 


Village Hill Nursery 

ALPINES, PERENNIALS 


47 Cottage Street Depot Avenue 


ANNUAL PLANTS 


Easthampton Florence 


and 


Telephone 660 Telephone 819 


HERBS 




Williamsburg 



YOU MAY ALWAYS DEPEND UPON THE QUALITY OF FLOWERS 

WHICH COME FROM 




FLOWERS 



Brooks Gara|e 

COLONIAL ESSO DEALER 

GAS — OIL — ACCESSORIES 

ELECTRIC WELDING 

Route 9 Berkshire Trail 

Goshen, Mass. 



See This Office About the New 
Low Cost Theft and Robbery 

INSURANCE 

Franklin Kin^, Jr. 

Insurance 

277 Main Street Northampton 

Phone 610 



Compliments of 



R. A. MacLeod Nursery 



LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 



TELEPHONE 211 



OLD GOSHEN ROAD 



Purity Milk Cap Co. 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Telephone 294 



P. 0. B. 207 



Williamsburg 



Jones The Florist 

BULBS PERENNIALS 

CUT FLOWERS 

Floral Designs 



Telephone 4331 



Haydenville 



J. F. McAllister 

ESSO SERVICENTER 



Gasoline 



Motor Oil 



Tires, Batteries and Accessories 



Route 9 



Haydenville, Mass. 



Harlow's 

FINE LUGGAGE 

Bill Folds Keytainers 

Expert Repairing 

24 Center Street Telephone 155-^ 

Northampton 



Compliments of 



C. O. CARLSON 



GOSHEN 



Chilson s Shops 



W. LEROY CHILSON 
AWNINGS VENETIAN BLINDS 

FURNTURE COVERINGS AND UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 

Furniture Upholstering Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 



Harness Shop 

Slip Covers, Cushions 



Auto Tops and Upholstery 
Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 



34 Center Street, Northampton 



Compliments of 

The 



Haydenville Savings Bank 



Hillcrest Farm 


ALL KINDS OF ROUGH AND 




FNISHED LUMBER 


Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 


PURE MAPLE SYRUP 


SINGLE COMB 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 


FANCY CAKE SUGAR 
and SOFT SUGAR 


Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 


Packard Bros. 

Goshen 


Williamsburg, Mass. 


Telephone 4633 Williamsburg R.F.D. 


GOOD THINGS TO EAT 


Compliments of 


Beckmann s 


Tne Clar^ Farm 


TRY OUR MAPLE 


NORTHAMPTON 


SYRUP 




For Farm and Village Property 


Candy Mailed Tasty Pastries 


Consult Silas Snow 


Refreshing Sodas Fine Ice Cream 


Telephone 3563 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



Frank Crone and Purina Mills 



Compliments of 



Candle Li^ht Den 



Goshen Road 



Williamsburg 



WHEN IN NEED OF 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, 

SHOES 

For Men and Boys 

Try 

orence Store 

Florence 
J. A. Longtin 



TkeFl 

90 Maple Street 
Telephone 828-W 



Service — Quality — Satisfaction 



Compliments of 



The Haydenville Company 



For the young man who gradu- 
ates this year we have every- 
thing that he will need for this 
important occasion. 

Merritt Clark & Co. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Breduet s Service Station 



MOBILGAS 



MOBILOIL 



MOBILUBRICATION 



Florence 



Mass. 



Compliments of 



John H. Graham Estate 



COAL — OIL — ICE 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 



F. N. Graves & Son 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 



Herlihy's 



DRY GOODS STORE 



76 Maple Street 



Florence 



Wm. Baker & Son 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



Service — Courtesy — Satisfaction 



Telephone 2341 



Chesterfield, Mass. 



Herman A. Cohn 



Phone 1426 



The Fair Store 

WOMEN'S MEN'S AND 

CHILDREN'S WEAR 

SHOES 

27-29 Pleasant Street Northampton 

Open Evenings by Appointment 

Shultz Beauty Shop 

FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST 
AND THE MOST FOR THEIR MONEY 

223 Main Street Telephone 567 

Up One Flight 

Martin A. Paddock 

TAILORING CO. 

FINE CUSTOM TAILORING 
FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

4 Crafts Avenue Next to City Hall 

E. J. O'Donnell 

POULTRY AND DAIRY FEEDS 

MASON SUPPLIES 
Hay, Straw and Peat Moss,, Seeds 



Phone 414 



29 No. Maple Street 



HOFFMAN STUDIO 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



52 Center Street Telephone 2068 

Northampton, Mass. 



CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R. BISBEE 

Telephone Chesterfield 2143 Telephone Chesterfield 2141 

BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 
Grain, Feed, Fertilizers, Salt, Cement, and Agricultural Tools 

Bird & Sons Roofing Paper Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material High Grade Grass Seed 

Oliver Plows and Cultivators 
Norfolk Paint 

Get Our Prices on Anything You Need 

Before Ordering Elsewhere 

STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 

Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg Mass., R.F.D. 1 



WAR BONDS 


Williamsburg Garage 


AND 


C. K. Hathaway 


STAMPS 


Telephone 4351 


WILLIAMSBURG POST 
OFFICE 


SERVICE STATION 

Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 




Williamsburg, Mass. 




Compliments of 


Socon^ Service Station 


First National 


Dial 275 
Williamsburg, Mass. 


Store 




Williamsburg, Mass. 




Cnas. A. Bowker 


Compliments of 






HARDWARE PAINT 


R. F. Burke 


and 




GENERAL MERCHANDISE 


WILLIAMSBURG 






Telephone 245 Williamsburg 



C. F. JENKINS 



STATIONERY — GREETNG CARDS — MEDICINES 



ICE CREAM 



Williamsburg 



Massachusetts 



Compliments of 

Wm. J. Sneenan & Company 



Haydenville 



Compliments of 



E. J. Gusetti 



Haydenville 



Tremmav^ Drug; Co. 

The Rexall Store 

M. L. Sender, Ph.G., Reg. M. Prop. 

Same Service as Always 

Pay Gas, Electric, and 

Telephone Bills 

Telephone 2300 131 Main Street 

Florence 



Compliments of 



Fl 



orence bavin 



ds Bank 



Florence 



Mass. 



Nutting s Oil Service 

TEXACO GASOLINE 
RANGE OIL MOTOR OIL 



Telephone 1816-M 
Telephone 1916-J 



Northampton 
Florence 



ELY FUNERAL HOME 

CHARLES E. ELY 



Telephone 1292-W 



Northampton 



LADY ASSISTANT 



RUBY'S 



Northampton's Largest Furniture Store 



15 Bridge St., 



Phone 3519 



Northampton 



Compliments of 

Harlow & F 



ennesse^ 



OFFICE SUPPLIES 
AND STATIONERY 

Wholesale and Retail 
Newsdealer 

Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 



A F 



rien< 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 



FOR EVERY SPORT 



T. A. PURSEGLOVE 



15 State Street 



O. T. DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A little 
fore-sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will 
help them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 



201 Main Street 



Telephone 184-W 



Northampton 



Ward Miller 

The Westinghouse Store 

.OIL BURNERS AND SERVICE.. 
Home Insulation 



14 Center Street 
Northampton 



Phone 2123-R 
Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



Moriart^ Bros. 



FURNITURE 



Northampton 



ARTS 

AND 

CRAFTS 

HOME INDUSTRIES 
Hanchcrart Shop 

18 Center Street Northampton 

Northampton, Mass. 



D 



earirii 



R 



m£s 



Are the best values we have ever pre- 
sented. Ask to see our special Onyx 
rings with a genuine diamond set in the 
onyx. 

Men's at $15 Up 
Ladies' at $9.75 Up 

EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS 
OF 
"BYSON" and 

LONGINES 
WATCHES 




Thorough business training was never so essential for so many people 

Northampton Commercial College 
John C. Pickett, Principal 

"The School of Thoroughness" 



18th YEAR 



48th YEAR 



Compliments of 


CLASS OF '41 


A. Soltys 


Compliments of 


MEATS GROCERIES 


J. R. Mansfield & Son 




FUNERAL HOME 


VEGETABLES 


South Main Street 


Telephone 223 Haydenville 


Haydenville Mass. 


Compliments of 


G. L. GRANT CO. 


Haydenville Mass. 



Yi 7 . E. Londerglan 




PRINTING 


Compliments of 


30 Crafts Avenue Northampton 


A Friend 


Tel. 1740 





Compliments of The Class of 1944 



Compliments of 



Northampton Street Railway Co. 



EDWARD A. PELLISSIER 

General Manager 



m BUST 




i 



mm 



m 



m 







mm